Windows 10



  • Ok, so I know I’m jumping the gun here, so stick with me.

    With Windows 10 being released sometime this summer, how much of a hassle should it be to get FOG to work with it? I haven’t tried, and a cursory search of the forums didn’t lead to much, so I’m wondering.

    Thanks!



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  • [quote=“need2, post: 45182, member: 21891”]I greatly look forward to any documentation of your travels in this. It is something I have fiddled with, but have lacked the time to actually work on. I have a hunch that, if you are running a Windows Server Domain environment, you could use a WDS server to figure out the different systems, then chain it into the appropriate boot files fog FOG.[/quote]

    Follow my travels here: [url]http://fogproject.org/forum/threads/undionly-kpxe-and-ipxe-efi.12607/[/url]

    That’s the junk thread that everything I find is going into… When I’ve got it nailed down, I’ll make a wiki article.


  • Moderator

    [quote=“Wayne Workman, post: 44866, member: 28155”]Today at work, I noticed that my workstation supports UEFI and legacy.

    I plan to turn UEFI on, and figure out the DHCP settings to make FOG work with Legacy BIOS and UEFI at the same time, diving out either undionly.kpxe or ipxe.efi based on the computer’s request.

    Don’t know if I’ll figure it out, but there is a pretty good chance that I will.[/quote]

    I greatly look forward to any documentation of your travels in this. It is something I have fiddled with, but have lacked the time to actually work on. I have a hunch that, if you are running a Windows Server Domain environment, you could use a WDS server to figure out the different systems, then chain it into the appropriate boot files fog FOG.



  • That is absolutely possible via [URL=‘http://www.fogproject.org/wiki/index.php?title=Using_FOG_with_an_unmodifiable_DHCP_server/_Using_FOG_with_no_DHCP_server’]ProxyDHCP[/URL]. However, I’ve been fighting with it since clients seem to get the wrong next-server (DHCP options 66/67) if it’s not set via Windows DHCP.



  • Today at work, I noticed that my workstation supports UEFI and legacy.

    I plan to turn UEFI on, and figure out the DHCP settings to make FOG work with Legacy BIOS and UEFI at the same time, diving out either undionly.kpxe or ipxe.efi based on the computer’s request.

    Don’t know if I’ll figure it out, but there is a pretty good chance that I will.



  • Not trying to be ugly, but there are no “rumors” of Windows 10 requiring Secure Boot. The only “rumor” is that Microsoft will no longer [B]require[/B] hardware OEMs to provide consumers an option to disable Secure Boot. The HPs and Dells of the world will continue doing so, especially in enterprise, so it’s likely a non-issue.

    Anything more that you’ve “heard” on this subject is categorically false.

    Windows 10 is not a threat in and of itself. The bigger threat is the mixed environments comment that was mentioned earlier. That’s quickly becoming an absolutely enormous issue.



  • I have a UEFI device. Unfortunately, the biggest problem with ProxyDHCP is that iPXE tries to download the ipxe.conf file from the main DNS server instead of the ProxyDHCP server in my environment.



  • OSX is designed to only run on Mac hardware (even though it’s been broken)…

    How about when the entire smart phone industry tried vehemently to prevent jail breaking and rooting, till federal regulators said they shouldn’t… [url]http://www.wired.com/2010/07/feds-ok-iphone-jailbreaking/[/url]

    I don’t think some manufacturers care, and it’s quite possible that there would be a demand for machines that DO have secure boot irreversibly in place… Think about finance systems, bank systems, heck - even small business owners… that want to make SURE nobody can just load up a live-Linux CD and access their files, or boot from some live-flash drive…

    How about this… You’re looking to buy a new computer, but you don’t know anything beyond basic usage to get a task done… You go to the store and have an employee help you pick one out. The employee says “This one is a little more secure because it has ‘Secure Boot’ on it, and this other one which costs the same doesn’t have it”

    Which one would you pick?


  • Senior Developer

    No reason to believe, but the fact that it’s there means headaches for us, and potentially all imaging solutions besides MDT/WDS paired.


  • Moderator

    There’s still no reason to believe that an OEM who wants to still be relevant to enterprise would force secure boot.



  • [url]http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/201722-linuxs-worst-case-scenario-microsoft-makes-secure-boot-mandatory-locks-out-other-operating-systems[/url]

    [url]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/03/windows-10-to-make-the-secure-boot-alt-os-lock-out-a-reality/[/url]

    According to those, Microsoft isn’t requiring UEFI to be optional for hardware manufacturers… which means hardware designers may make it non-optional.

    This would only affect new hardware, obviously.

    Still though, it’s a huge issue as far as FOG is concerned.


  • Moderator

    Those rumors sound incredibly odd, considering Microsoft wants to get all Windows 7 and 8 users to upgrade to 10, and many Windows 7 systems are incapable of UEFI. Not saying they won’t do that, but it sounds quite odd.



  • There’s been roomers on the internet that Windows 10 will require UEFI, and not allow it to be disabled.

    This might not apply to the Demo…


  • Moderator

    I have all of the bits and bobs to work on such an environment… just not the time right now.

    On the upside, from everything I have read, and from what I’ve been able to get a preview copy of Windows 10 to run on, I am not sure where this Secure Boot (UEFI) requirement is coming from. I have Windows 10 running on a virtual machine whose emulated bios is not on UEFI mode.


  • Senior Developer

    Same here.



  • [quote=“Tom Elliott, post: 44712, member: 7271”]Windows 10 currently works. The question should be when Windows 10 is released, how will it work if Secure Boot is required hence requiring a UEFI system?[/quote]

    The problem of a mixed environment (undionly.kpxe and ipxe.efi) keeps coming up…

    We gotta tackle this for ProxyDHCP using Windows Server…

    If I just HAD a UEFI device, I could work on it…



  • Ack, didn’t even think of that. We’re still on all legacy bios machines due to their age (but they still run the 10 technical preview fine) , but that’s something to consider moving forward…

    Thanks!


  • Senior Developer

    Windows 10 currently works. The question should be when Windows 10 is released, how will it work if Secure Boot is required hence requiring a UEFI system?


 

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