Need Tutorial for Making this Work with UEFI



  • Good morning, all.

    So, here’s the situation:

    I know that UEFI currently does not work. I know there are workarounds. I’ve seen stuff using boot disks, CloneZilla, etc, etc…however—this stuff is old (Pre-1.0.0), so a lot of it doesn’t work when trying it out.

    Does anyone have a workaround for UEFI that will work without having to use legacy boot?

    We are getting a bunch of Dell E5540’s in this week which will be Windows 8.1 with UEFI. Since these will be going to mobile users, we need to be able to image them quickly. We would like to keep the UEFI if at all possible.

    Thanks!



  • Also, are you able to boot to a recovery partition by pressing F8? If so, Windows 8 has some recovery tools in there for startup issues.



  • [quote=“Lucas K, post: 47159, member: 29655”]Sorry for answering this old post, but i have the same trouble like you imaging gpt windows 8.1 disk
    I used single disk multiple partition not resizable mode because the other mode didn t uploaded the image.
    i did all the steps wrtitten above and I get this error when i download the image to the laptop:

    How do you workaround this?

    Thanks in advance.

    LucasK.[/quote]

    Everything has to be set back exactly as it was before the imaging. If secure boot was enabled, re-enable it, along with all the other original options. (UEFI boot, etc.)



  • Sorry for answering this old post, but i have the same trouble like you imaging gpt windows 8.1 disk
    I used single disk multiple partition not resizable mode because the other mode didn t uploaded the image.
    i did all the steps wrtitten above and I get this error when i download the image to the laptop:

    [quote]“Windows needs to be repaired” screen, with error 0xC0000225.
    "A required file is missing or contains errors."
    It points to the \windows\system32\winload.efi file.[/quote]

    How do you workaround this?

    Thanks in advance.

    LucasK.



  • Jamie: A tip for you re: Dell BIOS options. You can use the Dell BIOS utility from their website to create a EXE file that will change BIOS settings when executed on a machine. When you want to image, you make a script that you push out with active directory that changes the boot options to something that will work with FOG.

    Inside your image, you have another version of the file that changes it back to secure boot, and is executed from your SetupComplete.cmd. I haven’t used it to do that, but I have used it in our general image to make sure that BIOS settings are universally the same.



  • I still find it easier to forget about the factory image altogether. We just purchased a bunch of E5540 laptops for our sales team, which came preloaded with Dell bloatware, as well as Microsoft software we don’t need/don’t use.
    Plus, as many of you know, Windows 8 has the metro screen with all sorts of unnecessary apps tied to it.
    We just did a disk to disk copy of the factory image and tossed it in our fire safe in the REMOTE instance that we may need it. I also created a fog image of it, but you have to do a RAW copy, which will take several hours, and honestly, why do you need it?
    As IT admins, our job is to streamline everything to make downtime less, and confusion less. I honestly believe that the more partitions you have on a drive, the more problems you are causing for yourself.
    What I love about FOG is that once I have an image, I’m no more than 2 hours away from having a completed deployment. (Usually it averages around 30 minutes) When I was using Ghost, that was a crapshoot.
    My images are one partition, plus any reserved partition that Windows creates upon installation. That’s it. I don’t need a recovery partition. We use Windows backup on our desktops for the Windows 7 machines, File History for Windows 8, and Windows Server Backup on our servers, with Shadow copies on the file servers. If someone hoses their machine, I just load up FOG, image the machine, and copy their profile from the backup server. Done, and usually by the time they get back from lunch.
    If I was relying on a factory recovery partition, I would be putting myself in a position where that would fail (which they often do), and they tend to take a long time.
    Less partitions = less problems.

    I haven’t had any issues with FOG and the BIOS Product Key. It’s been image, product key, go.



  • [quote=“Jamie Rozek, post: 36970, member: 24394”]I’m not sure why you want that functionality to begin with? Why not image the factory laptop if you really want the factory image…and then make your regular fog image?[/quote]

    Actually, that might be what I have to do.
    Im hunting thru these awesome forums to find out if Fog allows me to image the factory HDD for an ASUS laptop.
    My goal was: IMAGE the HDD
    replace with a much smaller SSD
    Fog that new BLANK SSD with the factory image I made of the official ASUS 1TB HDD…
    (see where im going?)
    …and then BAM, theoretically I can have exact factory images of the original 1TB ASUS drive, but on a smaller faster SSD.

    The user then powers on their new modified laptop, but gets the exact experience as if nothing has changed from factory.
    Also, this should take care of the BIOS Product Key Windows 8.1 thing i think (product keys no longer under laptops)



  • I’m not sure why you want that functionality to begin with? Why not image the factory laptop if you really want the factory image…and then make your regular fog image?
    We don’t see any reason here to use the factory recovery options, and frankly, they are a pain in the a@#. They create numerous, non-consecutive partitions that can’t be joined or separated. I find it easier to just create one, fresh partition.
    I mean, that’s what Fog is all about anyway, right? Fast imaging? I guarantee you will be able to restore an image to that laptop quicker with Fog than you would with that factory reset option.


  • Moderator

    Yes, this should be a new thread, and no, you shouldn’t use OEM partitions in combination with FOG imaging.



  • Sorry to re-open this thread, the steps above all work great but has anyone had any experience/issues with booting to OEM recovery partitions after deploying images? I have a Sony VAIO laptop here with an OEM recovery partition, which provides functionality to restore the laptop to factory settings.

    I perform the same steps as above disabling secure boot, enable legacy boot, deploy image image, enable uefi boot, enable secure boot and it boots into Windows 8 perfectly. However, the built in F10 function to boot into the Sony recovery partition gives the winload.efi error 0xC0000225.

    Anyone experienced the same issue?

    If i need to re-post elsewhere or start a new thread please let me know.

    Thanks
    LA



  • No problem, you guys helped me quite a bit here, so now it’s my turn!



  • Thanks :)


  • Moderator

    This is great. Thanks for reporting your results.


  • Senior Developer


  • Senior Developer

    Thank you for the detail.

    I’ll see if I can get this into a WIKI article for the time being as well so other’s have a starting point.



  • Got it to work after researching things you’ve placed in the forums and what not. Here is the run down:

    1. Disable Secure Boot
    2. Enable the Legacy Boot Option (You may have an option in Advanced Boot Options to Enable Legacy ROMS. You want to check this, as well to allow the legacy PXE to appear)
    3. Restart and register the machine in Fog.
    4. Create the upload task in the Web GUI.
    5. Restart and upload your image.
    6. On the machines to be imaged, repeat steps 1-3.
    7. Create the download task in the Web GUI, if you aren’t using Capone.
    8. Restart the machines and download the image.
    9. Re-enable Secure Boot. (You will probably have to disable legacy boot option and legacy ROMS in order to do this.)
    10. Reboot, BAM! It’s been FOGGED!


  • Alright, Tom—I followed your instructions:
    (This is for a test machine—so I’m uploading the image with one drive, removing it, and downloading the image with a clean drive on the same machine.)
    -I disabled SecureBoot, leaving UEFI alone.
    -Uploaded the image
    -Swapped the hard drive.
    -Downloaded the image.
    -Enabled SecureBoot

    I get the “Windows needs to be repaired” screen, with error 0xC0000225.
    "A required file is missing or contains errors."
    It points to the \windows\system32\winload.efi file.



  • Alright, so here’s the story:

    We had that rogue DHCP server. It was our secondary DC, which was VLAN-d to a network that no one else could access anyway, so it really wasn’t causing problems. I disconnected the NIC, anyway.

    I was just ignoring the comments about portfast, because myself and the other network engineer were under the impression it was already enabled on our switches. Ignorance will be the death of all IT.
    Portfast was NOT enabled. We spent about an hour discussing WHY Cisco would not enable this by default, since the default setting will ignore any port that is in switchport-access trunk mode to begin with.

    Whatever. That puppy grabbed a DHCP reservation right away, and brought the Fog Menu up less than 5 seconds later.

    It’s now imaging, and hopefully we will have it all done testing, etc…by the time our new laptops get here so we can just image and deploy.

    Thanks, all! You’re great!



  • Welp… I do have some DHCP issues, it appears. One of my DC’s is showing as both authorized and “rogue.” I’m going to have to figure out what’s going on there. We had set this up at one point to be a DHCP server for a VLAN that would be for virtual servers, which never came to fruition. I’m wondering if something from that is mucking things up somewhere.


  • Developer

    Are you having DHCP issues on your network?

    Download: [url]http://blogs.technet.com/b/teamdhcp/archive/2009/07/03/rogue-dhcp-server-detection.aspx[/url]

    There you will find a Rogue DHCP Detector. Run this and check the time(ms) it takes to get an ip. I would hope that it is under 300ms. If over 300ms then your looking at an issue with your DHCP server. If under that in windows there may be an issue with your network switches passing the DCHP under pxe situations. Such as STP or portfast settings may need to be changed.


Log in to reply
 

727
Online

39.3k
Users

11.0k
Topics

104.4k
Posts

Looks like your connection to FOG Project was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.