FOG server on multiple IPs on multiple VLANs



  • My subject basically says it all: in order to do multicasting across a fairly complex network for all of our call center workstations I need FOG to be available on multiple subnets.

    In my research via google, I have found a few helpful tips but nothing concrete. I noticed, for once, that the registration option via the PXE menu has the ip of the web service that the information is relayed to embedded in it, didn’t know if there was a way around that without having an option on the PXE menu for each subnet. Also TFTP doesn’t seem to respond on the original interface if the secondary interface is even up, let alone if it’s configured to use it.

    I’m hoping that with help from you all I can figure this all out, and then document it and stick it in the wiki someplace.



  • You need to get your network admin to setup the network to allow multicasting across subnets see example here:-
    http://www.fogproject.org/wiki/index.php/Cisco_Multi_Cast



  • @chad-bisd, post: 15972, member: 18 said:

    I believe I moved this thread because it’s not a FOG problem per se, but more of a general networking/os configuration issue.
    Oh cool, that makes sense.

    @chad-bisd, post: 15972, member: 18 said:

    I think the easiest thing for you to do is to make multiple FOG servers. Leave your first FOG server as the (M)ain server and install a FOG server in (S)torage mode for each VLAN. Make a storage group for each VLAN, and make a storage node in the storage group for each VLAN.

    In other words, if you have 5 different VLAN’s/Subnets you want to multicast with FOG, you’ll have 6 servers. The main server, and a storage node in each VLAN. You’ll store the image for each subnet on the storage node in the storage group for that subnet.

    I have a similar setup, but I have multiple storage groups setup, and each storage group has one storage node in it. I do this so I can unicast a group while uploading another image, or unicast to multiple groups without slowing the system down. I’m thinking you could do something similar, but with the intent to be multicast.

    Since you are multicasting, you don’t need much of a machine, it could even be a VM. Multicasting requires more memory on the server than unicasting does, but unicasting requires a better disk subsystem.

    I’ll be happy to advise on how to set this up if you want, or you can continue trying to setup and configure the way you originally asked about.

    Gosh, there really isn’t a cleaner way than that to do this? I was hoping there’d be a way I could accomplish it with one server with multiple virtual IPs and having the different services listening on all of them.


  • Moderator

    I believe I moved this thread because it’s not a FOG problem per se, but more of a general networking/os configuration issue.

    I think the easiest thing for you to do is to make multiple FOG servers. Leave your first FOG server as the (M)ain server and install a FOG server in (S)torage mode for each VLAN. Make a storage group for each VLAN, and make a storage node in the storage group for each VLAN.

    In other words, if you have 5 different VLAN’s/Subnets you want to multicast with FOG, you’ll have 6 servers. The main server, and a storage node in each VLAN. You’ll store the image for each subnet on the storage node in the storage group for that subnet.

    I have a similar setup, but I have multiple storage groups setup, and each storage group has one storage node in it. I do this so I can unicast a group while uploading another image, or unicast to multiple groups without slowing the system down. I’m thinking you could do something similar, but with the intent to be multicast.

    Since you are multicasting, you don’t need much of a machine, it could even be a VM. Multicasting requires more memory on the server than unicasting does, but unicasting requires a better disk subsystem.

    I’ll be happy to advise on how to set this up if you want, or you can continue trying to setup and configure the way you originally asked about.



  • @Tom Elliott, post: 15657, member: 7271 said:

    Happy Paste Eating!

    Ha thanks man, it’s an acquired taste.

    @chad-bisd, post: 15739, member: 18 said:

    Tell your network guys to turn on IGMP snooping so that the network equipment only sends multicast traffic to interfaces that request it. They may have to setup multicast groups or multicast profiles depending on the make/model/revision of networking equipment you have.

    You only need to have multiple interfaces on the FOG server if you actually create untagged VLAN ports on the switch for each group. Untagged ports basically act as a separate switch. Like if you had your FOG server and 4 workstations plugged into ports 1-5 and they were all untagged VLAN 20. They could only talk to each other and nothing else on the switch. If you tag those ports to the other VLANS, then any device that understands tagging (802.1Q I think) can decide for itself if the traffic belongs to it.

    To be able to help you, I think we need more concrete details.

    Your subnetting/VLAN info to start. I’ll assume you are using private addressing (10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x, or 192,168.x.x) right?

    Apologies for the delay, I’ve been out of town; also, I’m not sure why I put this thread under “Linux Problems.”

    I have the FOG server on a VLAN, say VLAN 40, with an IP of 10.85.40.4. I have several rooms of a few hundred pcs each, say 10.85.30.x, .31.x, .32.x, and so on. All of the clients are plugging into a Cisco 4510 (each room on it’s own VLAN), and the FOG server is on another switch.


  • Moderator

    Tell your network guys to turn on IGMP snooping so that the network equipment only sends multicast traffic to interfaces that request it. They may have to setup multicast groups or multicast profiles depending on the make/model/revision of networking equipment you have.

    You only need to have multiple interfaces on the FOG server if you actually create untagged VLAN ports on the switch for each group. Untagged ports basically act as a separate switch. Like if you had your FOG server and 4 workstations plugged into ports 1-5 and they were all untagged VLAN 20. They could only talk to each other and nothing else on the switch. If you tag those ports to the other VLANS, then any device that understands tagging (802.1Q I think) can decide for itself if the traffic belongs to it.

    To be able to help you, I think we need more concrete details.

    Your subnetting/VLAN info to start. I’ll assume you are using private addressing (10.x.x.x, 172.16.x.x, or 192,168.x.x) right?


  • Senior Developer

    Happy Paste Eating!


  • Senior Developer

    Lol,

    I don’t know what the best option for your setup will be. I still think working the scopes to communicate back to the FOG server would be the easiest to setup as it’s all done from the same (theoretically) machine. Multicast should work as UDP doesn’t care how it traverses the network from my understanding. So long as the VLAN’s can communicate with one another, you should be good to go.



  • While it may be possible to multicast across VLANs without having an interface on each one, my supervisor and our network/linux admin told me that we did. I’m just the Windows admin who came from eating paste in the corner to try and make my life easier, and then I can go back to eating paste.



  • I currently have around 600 workstations on one floor that I use FOG with. Previously all of them were on one VLAN with a very large DHCP scope. As part of a network overhaul, we are separating different areas into different subnets. In order for multicasting to work, as far as I can tell, I need to have an interface for FOG on each of those subnets.



  • Hi apathic admin! personally the way I manage my deployment server is with 2 nics 1 on my main network and it display the web interface. the other provide dhcp tftp and pxe is on a separated vlan. when i need to image a computer I just reconfigure my switch port for being on the deployment vlan and I switch it back after. it’s safer at my advice and easyest to manage.


  • Senior Developer

    I don’t know if I fully understand the issue. Where I work, we have Switches at each of the schools. Each school has it’s own subnet (persay) for their networking support. All schools use the same FOG Server. I’ll talk more with our network tech to find out how it was done, but it sounds like you just need to add the routes back to the FOG server on each of the VLAN’s. It shouldn’t be too difficult. If you’re trying to keep building a and building c from communicating internally, I’m guessing you’ve been successful so far. However, if you’re in building c and you want to ping a system in building a, can you? If you can, then it should be relatively easy to just tell the switches and PXE boot options within the dhcp configuration for each subnet to look for the FOG server.


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