Win10 Clients after Deployment BSOD on First Boot


  • All,

    I am having a strange issue that I hope someone might be able to help me with. I just recently created a new fog image for a Win10 Pro pc. We have this host PC registered to the fog, and we captured the image fine. This host computer has no issues booting, restarting, or shutting down.

    We have identical machines that we configure (hardware wise) and we use the host image to deploy this image to multiple PCs. Then we change the product key and re-activate windows. On the initial deployment, the fog server attempts to reboot the client that was just fog’d. On this first reboot, the system will immediately BSOD. We power down, enter the BIOS and change no settings. On the next boot, we get the startup repair screen - if you select continue to Windows it will boot without issues.

    Is there something that I have configured on my host image incorrectly that is causing the new clients to fail on that first boot? Or is this strange, but expected behavior?

    Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated.


  • @sebastian-roth Thank you for your suggestions. My team and I were able to start from scratch with a new Win10 Pro image and we captured/deployed this new revision without issues. There must have been some sort of driver or configuration issue on the actual host image that was causing this.

    Thank you for helping me double check that everything in my Fog settings were properly configured.

  • Senior Developer

    @cdutko said in Win10 Clients after Deployment BSOD on First Boot:

    I did some research on my own and came across the ‘sysprep’ feature. This is something that I have never done for my clients in the past and I have never seemed to have an issue. I don’t really know if it is necessary for me to do this as on my other Windows 10 images, I don’t have this issue.

    That should not be necessary.

    As I said, use resizable image type only when you need to deploy to machines with a different size disk. So I suggest you just create a new image definition (non-resizable), capture again and deploy this to another machine to see if you still get the BSOD.

    Please take a picture of the error on screen and post here.


  • @sebastian-roth I am using version FOG 1.5.8. I have updated the Kernel to be the latest as well. This is a 10th gen intel system, so the original Kernel for 1.5.8 did not have the correct Ethernet driver for the new motherboard.

    For my host image, I have no “Host Bios EXT Type or Host EFI Exit Type” selected. The OS type is set to Windows 10 -(9), and the image type is “Single Disk Resizable”. Partition selection is “Everything”.

    The compression slider is left to the default level, and the Image Manager is Partclone Gzip.

    The system after deployment, will attempt to boot into windows. It fails 2 times, then boots into startup repair. Once you are in the startup repair menu, you can simply continue to Windows 10 and it works as expected.

    I did some research on my own and came across the ‘sysprep’ feature. This is something that I have never done for my clients in the past and I have never seemed to have an issue. I don’t really know if it is necessary for me to do this as on my other Windows 10 images, I don’t have this issue.

  • Senior Developer

    @cdutko First question, which version of FOG do you use?

    Should not be like that I would say. It’s strange you get the BSOD on the first boot only. Do you get more details in what is causing the BSOD? Maybe take a picture and post here.

    Now about FOG settings. Many people use resizable Image type even if there is no need to just because it’s the default. If you really have identical systems (most importantly for FOG is disk needs to be identical in size/sector count), then I would suggest using the non-resizable image type. There is less “magic” in the background going in that could cause an issue in special cases.

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