PXE legacy boot não funciona somente em um modelo de computador


  • Hello guys, sorry for the English!

    I’m having trouble booting over the network on a certain brand / model of computer waste.

    DEL and HP computers do not have this problem.

    The computer simply does not load that PXE screen looking for the boot server.

    My Fog version 1.5.7 is configured by pointing to the undionly.kpxe file. From what I saw this file is only for legacy boot. I saw that this computer is UEFI enabled by default. And you have the UEFI PXE IPV4 and IPV6 options. However, I saw in the forum and wiki that it is necessary to change the settings in my DHCP to use PXE UEFI changing the file, including the possibility of configuring more than one file. But I will try to do that at a more opportune time. With great difficulty I discovered where to change to legacy boot. However, even with legacy boot the computer does not even look for the server. Go to the next boot option (hard disck).

    The version of PXE that comes from what I saw is 2.1. I don’t know if that matters.

    Well, I will have to proceed with the formatting of each machine. But I posted here to try to solve that later.


  • @george1421 Thank you! I have already requested that this configuration be done in PfSense. They haven’t implemented it yet, but managed to boot legacy. It was an option in the setup that was missing to allow legacy boot.

    The option ‘Sistema Operacional Selecionado’ must be changed to Windows 7 or other.

    I leave it registered here in case anyone comes across this same type of configuration.

    link text

  • Moderator

    @Sckendall said in PXE legacy boot não funciona somente em um modelo de computador:

    Now let’s see, maybe I should be confused about things. Is there a distinction between BIOS computers, which you also call “legacy”, for UEFI computers? Isn’t it simply an option that changes in the firmware setup? If so, how could I identify each system?

    Well this change is important to know because the program to start up FOG changes because of the firmware type of the computer. The same actually holds true for Windows. There is a different OS startup program for bios and uefi. If the computer is bios you need for FOG to send the name undionly.kpxe to the target computer. If the computer is uefi you need to send ipxe.efi startup file name.

    In pfsense if you use it for dhcp, it supports dynamic boot files. I can’t tell you exactly from memory but in the dhcp server there is a pxe or netboot section. In that section there are 3 edit boxes. One is for bios(legacy) one is for uefi 64 bit and one for uefi 32 bit.

    bios: undionly.kpxe
    uefi64: ipxe.efi
    uefi32: i386/ipxe.efi


  • @george1421

    Hello george, thanks for the reply.

    Right away I rule out that it is a problem related to spanning tree. I have had related problems and even you helped me solve them.

    From what you said, pfsense supports dynamic startup files. This is good, we use pfsense. I will see this configuration with the people of the net later.

    Now let’s see, maybe I should be confused about things. Is there a distinction between BIOS computers, which you also call “legacy”, for UEFI computers? Isn’t it simply an option that changes in the firmware setup? If so, how could I identify each system?

    So. I went for a survey and that’s it. So UEFI systems are like replacements for BIOS.

    But still, with UEFI systems it is possible to boot as a legacy system, right? Because you have this option in the setup.

    What I don’t understand is why even changing the boot to legacy doesn’t work. I even think that despite the legacy option, the UEFI system has support for other legacy boots, but not legacy network boot. But I’m not sure and I didn’t find any technical details of this computer on the internet either.

  • Moderator

    Lets start with some background. There is a specific boot loader needed for each firmware type. For bios (legacy) computers you need to send boot file name undionly.kpxe to the computer. For uefi systems you need to send ipxe.efi to the target computer. You can not boot a bios computer with the uefi boot loader and the reverse is the same.

    Some dhcp servers support dynamic boot files (windows 2012 and later, linux, and pfsense routers, others do but let me stop there). You can configure these dhcp server to send the proper boot file because of the pxe booting computer. We have instructions on setting up windows dhcp and linux here: https://wiki.fogproject.org/wiki/index.php/BIOS_and_UEFI_Co-Existence

    I have seen where if your network switch that these computers are plugged into has standard spanning tree enabled you may get no configuration method available in the iPXE screen. In this case you need to change your network switch to support one of the fast spanning tree protocols (portfast, RSTP, MSTP, fastSTP, or what ever your switch manufacturer calls it).

    If your fog server and pxe booting computing is on the same subnet we can run a packet capture program to capture the pxe booting process for debugging purposes if we can’t find the problem before then.

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